BEE AND WASP STINGS CAN BE FATAL

BEE AND WASP STINGS CAN BE FATAL

Gardening expert Chris Beardshaw launches campaign to raise awareness of potentially fatal bee and wasp sting anaphylaxis

Chris Beardshaw has taken on a new role as the inaugural ambassador for ‘Bee Resistant 2018’, a national campaign that runs annually to highlight the dangers of anaphylaxis caused by bee and wasp stings.

The Bee Resistant campaign, now in its fourth year, partners with national charity, the Anaphylaxis Campaign to run from the start of bee season in May through to wasp season in September.

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BEE RESISTANT CAMPAIGN

Commenting on the launch of the Bee Resistant campaign for 2018, Chris said: “As a designer, gardener and occasional amateur bee keeper, I was delighted to return to the National Trust’s Hidcote Manor Garden – home to Lawrence Johnston’s 1920’s masterpiece and an absolute mecca for anyone who enjoys gardening.”

For some people, an allergy to the venom in a bee or wasp sting can cause a severe reaction, leading to anaphylaxis which can be fatal.
SOME FACTS

• In the UK, insect stings are the second most frequent cause of anaphylaxis outside medical settings: bee or wasp stings caused nearly three quarters of anaphylaxis deaths between 1992 and 2001 outside of hospitals

• People who experience anaphylactic shock after one sting are 60-70 percent more likely to show the same reaction in future.

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• Despite these figures, only 30 percent of people would know what to do if they were with someone who went into anaphylactic shock from a bee or wasp sting.

SYMPTOMS

With bees and wasps deadly for some people, the Bee Resistant awareness campaign aims to spread the word about venom anaphylaxis. It provides information on the symptoms to look out for and the range of avoidance and treatment options available to help reduce the risk:

• Feeling unwell and dizzy
• Rapidly spreading rash
• Wheezing and a tight chest
• Swelling of the airways and throat
• Weakness (caused by a drop in blood pressure)
• Physical collapse

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WHAT YOU CAN DO

Prevention – follow avoidance advice and tips
Treatment – there are a range of treatment options available on the NHS to treat anaphylaxis which include carrying adrenaline pens and specialist treatments available from hospital-based allergy clinics
In the event of a serious allergic reaction, call 999 immediately and state “anaphylaxis”
Consult your GP for further information and guidance

MORE INFORMATION
Visit https://beeresistant.com or follow us on Twitter @BeeResistant or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/BeeResistant

If you are at risk of insect venom anaphylaxis and would like more information and support please call the Anaphylaxis Campaign’s national helpline on 01252 542029, contact info@anaphylaxis.org.uk or visit www.anaphylaxis.org.uk. Follow us on Facebook or Twitter @Anaphylaxiscoms.

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Steve Ott

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