British Garden Centres’ top indoor plants

It is National Houseplant Week (January 9 – January 15) and the use of plants in interior design is still surging in popularity.  Houseplants are now seen and used as accent pieces, to brighten, soften or lighten areas of your rooms and are well known for their mental and health benefits.

ZZ Plant

The ZZ Plant (Zamioculcas zamiifolia) is the perfect plant for novice green fingers. Its smooth, shiny green stems and foliage compliment any interior perfectly, making it an attractive addition to any home.  The ZZ plant is drought tolerant and will grow happily in low light and is super easy to care for.  It is incredibly hardy and a virtually indestructible plant that will thrive and make an attractive focal point in any setting.

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Aloe vera

This succulent plant purifies the air of domestic nasties such as formaldehyde and benzene – two chemicals commonly found in household cleaning products. It also boasts healing properties too and is often known as the ‘first aid plant.’  Its succulent leaves are gel enriched with anti-bacterial aids used for medicinal cuts, burns, stings, and heat rash.

Peace lilies

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Peace lilies are renowned for cleaning and purifying the air, according to NASA research. The houseplant helps to remove toxins and creates a refreshing environment to live and work in. The ivory flowers and white bracts also make it a popular choice to have on the windowsill due to its simple beauty and calming qualities.

Monstera

The Swiss Cheese Plant originates from the South American rainforests and is big in interior design, often featured on social media and it is easy to see why. Its broad green leaves bring your home to life and this beautifully sculptural plant brings the tropical and jungle trend into any room. The monstera makes a statement in a smaller space and its heart-shaped leaves, once matured, split into the iconic hole pattern.

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Phalaenopsis Orchid

Also known as the moth orchid due to its flowers resembling a moth in flight, Phalaenopsis comes in an array of sizes and colours making them look elegant in every home.  They are considered among the easiest of the orchid family to care for and are the most popular indoor flowering plant in the UK. With their exotic blooms, orchids need good ambient light, although avoid direct sun through glass indoors.

Dracaena

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Commonly known as the Dragon Tree, this plant makes an excellent choice for the home as it purifies the air and eliminates pollutants. Extremely tough and hardy, they are the ideal architectural plants to brighten up dark corners or desktops with their variegated, spiky leaves and are perfect for a beginner gardener because they are extremely easy to grow indoors.

Calathea

One of the most popular selling houseplants is the Calathea, due to its many different textures and colours that can complement any interior. With over 100 different cultivars, its bright, bold leaves and many shapes mean they cater for everyone. Smaller plants are great for tabletop displays or windowsills whilst larger varieties make fantastic statement floor plants or on plant stands.

Cactus

A popular houseplant with beginners is the trusty cactus. Usually found in dry, harsh deserts, cacti are one of the only plants that thrive on neglect and are impossible to kill. They come in a range of shapes and sizes from the small to the statuesque. They are simple plants and simply require warm temperatures, bright sunlight, and minimal water making them the perfect choice for even novice green fingers.

Spider plant

One of the most popular houseplants is Chlorophytum comosum or the spider plant with long, dense leaves.  It is also well known for its health benefits and works to purify the air that we breathe and remove toxins from the environment around us. They are also easy for someone new to plants as they require little maintenance and need little water and be placed in indirect sunlight.

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Tony Flanagan
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